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Home Our Book: Mini Farming

Mini Farming: Self Sufficiency on 1/4 Acre

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Mini Farming

Self Sufficiency on 1/4 Acre

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Start a mini farm on a quarter acre or less and provide 85 percent of the food for a family of four—and earn an income. Mini Farming describes a holistic approach to small-area farming that will show you how to produce 85 percent of an average family’s food on just a quarter acre—and earn $thousands$ in cash annually while spending less than half the time that an ordinary job would require. Even if you have never been a farmer or a gardener, this book covers everything you need to know to get started.

If you could have only one book on your shelf to cover home food production, this is it.

Subjects covered include:

  • choosing crop varieties
  • saving seeds
  • starting seedlings
  • soil fertility practices including biochar, cover-cropping and crop rotation
  • composting in-depth
  • dealing with pest and disease problems
  • timing of planting
  • raising backyard chickens for eggs
  • raising and processing chickens for meat
  • complete plans for a mechanical chicken plucker
  • home canning, freezing and dehydrating
  • Materials, tools, and techniques are detailed with photographs, tables, diagrams, and illustrations. 100 color illustrations and photographs.

Let's be honest. The economy is a mess and likely to remain so for some time. The GAO has reported that Peak Oil is a real and proximate phenomenon that will make things even worse. Wages, even in high tech industries, have been stagnant for several years. We have no idea what challenges the future might bring.

The time to start raising your own food is not when people are already starving. The time to start is NOW.

 

Newsflash

If you have collected a large amount of chicken manure from the chicken coop over the winter, please make sure it is composted rather than placed on beds directly. Thermophilic composting as described in our book destroys pathogens; but raw chicken manure can contain both salmonella and e. coli. Even for crops that don't directly touch the ground, splash-up from raindrops can infect food. And, of course, low-growing crops like lettuce or spinach are a particular danger. Non-composted manure is what cause the recent wave of illnesses from spinach.